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Bridgeport man accused of plotting to fly bombs into buildings

Marcus Solis with the report from Bridgeport, CT.
April 9, 2014 5:58:42 AM PDT
A Moroccan national was detained without bail in Connecticut after FBI agents discovered his plot to fly bombs on drone-like devices made out of radio-controlled airplanes into a school and a federal building, according to federal authorities.

The FBI arrested 27-year-old El Mehdi Semlali Fahti on Monday on immigration-related charges, and he may later face terrorism charges in a federal grand jury investigation, federal prosecutors said.

"Did he ever talk about wanting to do those things?", we asked the suspect's roommate, who wants to remain anonymous.

"No, I got surprised, like you guys," he said. He says he had no idea an alleged terrorist plot was being hatched in his apartment.

A plan authorities say could have meant bombings at a federal building and/or at a college or university.

Police arrested Fahti Monday, who was living in a house in Bridgeport.

"Doesn't work, doesn't do anything. He just lay himself on the mattress, his bed and that's all," said his roommate.

According to court documents, Fahti was recorded stating his 'desire to bomb an educational university outside the state of Connecticut and a federal building in Connecticut.'

And that he 'was going to use a plane, a remote controlled hobby-type airplane, to deliver the bomb'.

The 27-year old Moroccan came to the U.S. in 2008 on a student visa, failed out of college in Virginia a year later, and moved to Connecticut in 2012.

"Typical weird guy, very incognito," said neighbor Jeff Pierre Charles.

"Just his demeanor. Always walk with his head down, never say hi to anybody," said neighbor Mike Saint Victor.

Fahti sought political asylum by claiming he faced persecution if he returned to Morocco. Of his plot, he allegedly tells an informant: "There are three things that scare people in the United States: causing harm to schools, the economy, and their sense of security."

"We live here for years and this has never happened. It's really bad, really bad," said neighbor Cleon Green.

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