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New surveillance cameras to prevent crime in Brooklyn

Tim Fleischer reports from Midwood.
February 19, 2014 4:03:22 PM PST
Big Brother is watching: in hopes of keeping people safe.

Hundreds of new cameras are being installed in Brooklyn neighborhoods.

It's the legacy of 8-year old Leiby Kletzky, who was kidnapped and murdered two and a half years ago. Surveillance cameras spotted Leiby with his killer.

About a dozen of the cameras are already operational and part of a special pilot program.

With a camera that never blinks, always peering down on the streets of Brooklyn, an extra set of eyes will now help to provide a network of safety.

"If it saves a life or makes a difference in a community in regards to serious crime, we are all going to see the results of this," said Brooklyn Assemblyman Dov Hikind.

320 Real Time Next Generation cameras will be at the ready from Midwood to Borough Park in hopes of preventing crime, or in the case of Leiby Kletzky, nearly three years ago, being able to locate someone in danger before it's too late.

"We know the value of cameras and we know the value of getting them to the NYPD fast," said former NYPD detective Desmond Smith, who now heads Securewatch 24, the company that is installing the cameras.

In Leiby Kletzky's case the private cameras that captured the boy were not linked to the NYPD.

"They had to download the video from the cameras. Someone had to go through the video, precious time" said Smith.

Leiby, who was seen following his killer Levi Aron in the startling video, was never seen alive again.

Leiby's father Nachman, in a prepared statement, said: "I feel better knowing that if there's a crime, a knockout attack, or God forbid a missing person, there are security cameras in the community that will help."

The cameras and the pilot program are paid for with $1 million of state funds, and will be fully installed through the spring, with about 10 installed a week.

"This is another tool to help the New York City Police Department, to help our community in terms of dealing with crime," said Hikind.


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