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MTA will not give refunds for suspended subway service

A train arrives to the Astor Place station early Friday, Dec. 16, 2005 in New York. (AP Photo/ Dima Gavrysh)
November 13, 2012 2:23:51 PM PST
Bad news for MTA riders who lost out on their MetroCards after Hurricane Sandy. The MTA says you shouldn't expect a refund, and that decision isn't sitting well with riders.

Bad news for MTA riders who lost out on their MetroCards after Hurricane Sandy. The MTA says you shouldn't expect a refund, and that decision isn't sitting well with riders.

Eyewitness News has reached out to the MTA to ask why they won't issue credits for lost time during the storm to riders who have monthly MetroCards, but officials won't answer our questions or go on-camera.

Talk to any straphanger in New York City, and they will all tell you how tough it was to get around after the superstorm.

"I live in Queens, and my business is on 36th street, so after the storm, I had to actually walk in from Astoria to see if we had power," said Steve Koepfer, a subway rider.

For the Thursday and Friday after the storm, the MTA waived fares for riders. But for the days when the subway system was not operational, the MTA will not be offering monthly MetroCard users a credit, which isn't sitting well with the people Eyewitness News talked to.

"They should be retroactive and get them credit, or get them free subway rides," said Michael Steczkowski, a subway rider.

"They should offer the credit to the people," added another subway rider, Kamaal Jilbert. "They paid for it. They paid in advance for the service."

"It upsets me because they said they would do it, and now they say they won't," said Sonia Dominguez, a subway rider.

The MTA did extend October monthly passes for the LIRR and Metro North by an extra week.

Across the river, New Jersey Transit did the same thing. They've also allowed riders to use one monthly pass for busses, ferries and trains.

When asked who the MTA handled the superstorm, Gene Russianoff, of the Straphanger's Campaign, said, "I think they did a really good job. It's a 108-year-old system. It was never built for this kind of surge flooding."

Rusianoff, with the Straphanger's Campaign, is fighting the MTA tooth-and-nail on increasing fares, but he agrees with their decision not to offer credits for monthly users.

"I think it's just too hard to do to provide refunds because people's train lines came on at different times," he said.

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ONLINE: mta.info

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