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Designers plan floating pool for East or Hudson River

July 6, 2011 7:17:56 PM PDT
It's a hot and sunny summer in New York, and three young designers standing along the Hudson are dreaming of jumping and cooling off.

"How are we going to get people to jump into the Hudson, hopefully by talking to them like our friends," said Archie Lee Coats, IV, of PlayLab, Inc.

The designers from Family and PlayLab are trying to convince New Yorkers to help fund build a floating swimming pool in the Hudson or East River.

"We like to call it an oasis out in the water, it will be clean water, it will look like clean water, it will smell like clean water," said Jeffrey Franklin, of PlayLab.

There are renderings of what that Oasis will look like.

It's called Plus Pool.

"So this part is about seven feet deep, this is the kids side so it slopes from zero to about three here, and this is what we're calling the lounge pool, so around six to eight," said Dong-Ping Wong, an architect.

Dong-Ping Wong is the architect, and is designing it to float like a boat and to clean the river pool with a water giant filter.

"We want to filter water through the pools, we want people to swim in the rivers but make it cleaner and safer than it is now," Wong said.

There are four potential locations with fabulous view of the city.

"It has a set of piers that sort of make these protective alcoves," Wong said.

It's designed for a max of 400 people and open to the public, it could also ease crowding at other city pools.

"I think it's a good idea, I'm up for it, yes absolutely," said Jean Peytavi, a Williamsburg resident.

"If the water is clean, might as well jump in," said Angel Baez, a Brooklyn resident.

They've launched an online fundraising campaign on kickstarter.com to help develop the technology.

But city approval is needed to open in by a target date of summer 2013.

"It's the one thing that hasn't been worked on yet, the waterfront has been, but not the water itself," Coats said.


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