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Get checked: Prostate cancer awareness testing

June 16, 2011 3:33:17 PM PDT
In the spirit of Father's Day, a free prostate cancer awareness testing will take place from noon to 4 p.m. on June 18 -- the day before dad's big day -- outside of the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum courtesy of the Hackensack University Medical Center.At the event, which is also being sponsored by Emblem Health, the Tri-State Ford dealers and Nautica, available at Macy's, participants will have the opportunity to meet and get an autograph from former New York Knicks star guard Earl "the Pearl" Monroe from noon to 1:15 p.m. Former New York Jets defensive tackle Marty Lyons will also be on hand to sign autographs from 1-2 p.m., as will Ed Charles and Art Shamsky from the 1969 "Miracle Mets" from 1-2:15 p.m.

In addition, the New York Knicks' City Dancers will make an appearance from 1-2 p.m., followed by the New York Jets' Flight Crew cheerleaders from 2-4 p.m. 1050 ESPN personality Jody Mac will also be broadcasting live from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. A DJ will be spinning hits from on site 1-4 p.m. Also, guests can sample food and enjoy an inflatable ESPN game during the entire event.

Plus, guys who take part in the testing will receive a $5 discount off of an adult admission into the Intrepid. Plus, the first 100 men who are tested will receive a free Nautica T-shirt.

In the event of rain, the testing will take place inside the museum's visitor center. The Intrepid is located at Pier 86 on the Hudson River at the intersection of West 46th Street and 12th Avenue in Manhattan.

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men, according to the American Cancer Society. David Pulli, the director of patient and family services for the ACS, will be on hand to answer any questions, as will Richard Gross, a representative from Emblem Health. According to the ACS, about one out of every six men will be diagnosed with it during his lifetime -- but more than two million men in the U.S. who have been diagnosed are still live today.


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